A Fence is not just a fence

Recently, I listed a gorgeous Victorian home in Kyneton. It is the kind of house that would generally sell very quickly in the current market but this one took a bit longer.

Why? Because the house was hidden behind a green colourbond that did not suit the home and its character appeal.

The owner soon replaced it with a white picket fence which immediately lifted the street appeal to potential buyers. The house was soon sold with a happy vendor and new owner in possession of a true Kyneton home of distinction.

Replacing or repairing boundary fences is often a simple thing to do to lift the charm of a home, support swifter selling and approving the overall amenity. If you want to replace your fence and you share a boundary, as many people do, you should reach out to your neighbour and discuss your intentions. Whether it is a replacement or a repair, generally your neighbours will need to agree to share the cost.

A good place to start is familiarising yourself with the Victorian Fences Act. The Fences Act contains rules about who pays for a dividing fence, the type of fence to be built, notices that neighbours need to give one another and how to resolve disputes that come up when discussing fencing works with your neighbour.

Secondly you should familiarise yourself with the Macedon Ranges Shire Council fence height restrictions and covenants. It is important to do this as if your fence is in breach of restrictions, you may need to remove it altogether or modify it until it complies.

In rare cases, where neighbours don’t wish to proceed with a new fence and refuse to pay, mediation may need to occur to bring the parties together in order to resolve the matters.

Whether it’s for privacy, keeping pets and kids inside or as a decorative feature, fencing adds safety, security and style to your home. Making sure you have happy neighbours or thinking long term about sales opportunities is something you might want to consider along the way.